Taking The Inside Looking Outside

One of the toughest photographic situations to handle if going inside a building with lots of gorgeous windows and trying to capture the scene with detail still visible outside. I used to take my photography students to just such a location to demonstrate how you can pull it off.

First I’ll mention cell phone photographers need not go further as it’s impossible to use this technique to get the shot. You’ll need a sturdy tripod and a camera capable of taking multiple shots of the same scene at different apertures. The technique is known as HDR or High Dynamic Range photography.

HDR photographs use 3-9 frames of the same exact shot taken at different lens openings or F-Stops. The basic idea is to cover all the bases, capturing detail in every nook & cranny of the scene. There’s detail in the darkest shadows as well as the brightest area in the picture. You then take your collection of exposures and blend them together in graphic editing software such as Photoshop. Each individual frame should be taken in RAW format, not JPG to give you the largest amount of data to utilize. The results can be spectacular, causing the casual viewer to scratch their head wondering how the photographer pulled it off.

There are plenty of lighting situations that scream for HDR photographs to be taken. Obviously scenes with a lot of movement aren’t one of them. Landscapes are a good example of where HDR can be used. Waterfalls with bright water and dark cliffs behind them are a classic example why HDR techniques would be beneficial.

If you’d like to learn how to should HDR photographs Google the term and read the step by step instructions to try it out. It’s not rocket science, it’s photography. šŸ™‚

The Outdoor Look at Vista House

sunrise-at-vista-house

Inside Vista House Looking Out

vista-house-hdr-1-framed

Multnomah Falls, Oregon – 9 frame HDR

multnomah-falls-framed

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